Best Drama Movies on Netflix Right Now (2020)

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276138 22: Screenwriter John Hodge, actor Ewen Bremner, director Danny Boyle, actor Johnny Lee Miller and producer Andrew Macdonald attend the premiere of ‘Trainspotting’ July 15, 1996, in New York City. This British film received a 1997 Academy Award nomination for Best Screenplay. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Liaison)
276138 22: Screenwriter John Hodge, actor Ewen Bremner, director Danny Boyle, actor Johnny Lee Miller and producer Andrew Macdonald attend the premiere of ‘Trainspotting’ July 15, 1996, in New York City. This British film received a 1997 Academy Award nomination for Best Screenplay. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Liaison) /

No. 15 – Trainspotting (1996)

Written by: John Hodge (screenplay)/Irvine Welsh (novel)

Directed by: Danny Boyle

Starring Ewan McGregor, Ewen Bremner, Robert Carlyle, Jonny Lee Miller, and Kevin McKidd

Trainspotting is an incredibly uncomfortable film about addiction, but it is a cult classic in every sense. Following the lives of five young men, most of whom are dealing with addiction, Danny Boyle’s film lets us peer into the world of drugs, addiction, and withdrawal, and the journey is quite rough. The film’s main protagonist, Rent Boy (McGregor), clearly wants to leave this life behind, despite all of the mistakes he’s made, yet can’t seem to destroy his own life while watching his friends (Bremner, Carlyle, McKidd and Miller) do the same.

Danny Boyle films tend to take us to places we aren’t necessarily prepared to handle, and he has a way of creating a very intense and dark world in front of our eyes without restoring to a large amount of violence. In even his other films, such as 28 Days Later, he manages to show us death, destruction, and violence in very abstract ways that actually make it more uncomfortable to experience. For instance, we watch as Rent Boy’s friend Tommy (McKidd) destroys his life by finally succumbing to addiction despite resisting for so long, yet we only see the aftermath of his destruction once he has HIV and is dying. Trainspotting does a brilliant job of allowing you to see this kind of pain from the characters, if only in glimpses, by contrasting it with what they could have been before or after their addictions.