Best Drama Movies on Netflix Right Now (2020)

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The cast and crew of the Big Short arrive on the red carpet at the 88th Oscars on February 28, 2016, in Hollywood, California. AFP PHOTO / ANGELA WEISS / AFP / ANGELA WEISS (Photo credit should read ANGELA WEISS/AFP/Getty Images)
The cast and crew of the Big Short arrive on the red carpet at the 88th Oscars on February 28, 2016, in Hollywood, California. AFP PHOTO / ANGELA WEISS / AFP / ANGELA WEISS (Photo credit should read ANGELA WEISS/AFP/Getty Images) /

No. 39 – The Big Short  (2015)

Written by: Charles Randolph and Adam McKay (film)/Michael Lewis (novel)

Directed by: Adam McKay

Starring Christian Bale, Ryan Gosling, Steve Carell and Brad Pitt

The Big Short follows three separate stories prior to the 2008 Financial Crisis, as several different within the banking industry attempted to “short” the housing crisis and cash in big on their bets. As their colleagues around them refuse to believe that there are any long term issues with the structure of the housing market, each of the three story lines tracks the pitfalls and triumphs of these particular traders. They encounter the massive financial gains and terrible human costs that the collapse of the market had on them and everyday Americans as well.

To be completely honest, The Big Short is a very confusing movie, and it knows that. As explained in fourth wall soliloquies by Ryan Gosling’s character, Jared, as well as several other celebrity cameos, the housing market was so convoluted and deceiving to average people, that it’s supposed to not make any sense. That is where the effectiveness of the film lies.

This is Adam McKay’s first real step into a semi-serious film, and for the most part, it succeeds. He still manages to hit as many comedic notes as possible with Gosling and Carell’s characters, while still managing to show some of the heartbreaking effects the ultimate collapse had on both employment and Americans’ abilities to stay in their homes. It may take a few viewings to fully grasp the plot, but this is a must watch and still very relevant to today.