Why is Ariana Grande: Excuse Me, I Love You rated TV-MA?

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - JANUARY 26: Ariana Grande performs onstage during the 62nd Annual GRAMMY Awards at STAPLES Center on January 26, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for The Recording Academy)
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - JANUARY 26: Ariana Grande performs onstage during the 62nd Annual GRAMMY Awards at STAPLES Center on January 26, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for The Recording Academy) /
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Excuse me, um, why is Ariana Grande’s Netflix special Excuse Me, I Love You rated TV-MA?

In Grande’s new Netflix documentary, there’s a lot of exciting stuff going on, to say the least. As reported by The New York Times, the majority of Excuse Me, I Love You focuses on the pop star’s performances during her 2019 Sweetener World Tour and of course, her incredible pipes.

As the publication notes, we’re also given “glimpses” into Ariana’s behind-the-scenes world and offstage life. Along with all of that must-see-to-believe concert footage, we’re given the sense that we’re getting to know the pop goddess on a uniquely personal level. Then, we go right back to being wowed by her stage persona, presence, and powerhouse vocals.

Short story long, you definitely won’t want to miss this music documentary. But thanks to that TV-MA rating, it might not be appropriate for everyone to watch.

So what’s the deal, you ask?

Is Ariana Grande: Excuse Me, I Love You okay for kids?

The Parents Guide on IMDb says that this one is rated TV-MA due to mild profanity and occasional nudity in the form of scantily clad dancers. A few viewers responded saying that there was a definite “buttocks” or two visible here and there, even if there was no graphic or direct nudity.

One person wrote, “Many scenes feature woman with uplifting clothing with buttocks visible.” Another said, “Buttocks can be seen in some parts. It’s not noticeable until you look really well.” So while no one is actually naked in the documentary, some dancers might be too close to it for certain age groups to watch move and shake.

The main issue, however, seems to be with the language. According to most of the feedback on IMDb, the use of profanity is mild, but the choice of words throughout is definitely way too mature for children, which sounds about right.

But if you’re old enough to watch this one, you might be pleasantly surprised by it. As noted in The New York Times, Excuse Me, I Love You is vividly intended for super fans, however, “even the most casual of fans might find themselves saying, simply, thank you.” And we’d tend to agree with that!

Next. 7 best Netflix documentaries of 2020. dark