FX’s The Weekly: Five stories that the New York Times team should cover next

THE WEEKLY "Babby Constantin" Episode 3 (Airs Sunday; June 16; 10:00 pm/ep) -- Pictured: Constantin Mutu. CR: FX
THE WEEKLY "Babby Constantin" Episode 3 (Airs Sunday; June 16; 10:00 pm/ep) -- Pictured: Constantin Mutu. CR: FX /
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THE WEEKLY “Connecting The World” Episode 7 (Airs Sunday; July 28, 10:00 pm/ep) — Pictured: New York Times reporter Jack Nicas speaking with Sergeant Daniel Anonsen. CR: FX
THE WEEKLY “Connecting The World” Episode 7 (Airs Sunday; July 28, 10:00 pm/ep) — Pictured: New York Times reporter Jack Nicas speaking with Sergeant Daniel Anonsen. CR: FX /

The New York Times based television series The Weekly has covered a number of important stories and there’s no shortage of topics worth exploring. Check out our list of suggestions in the slideshow below.

It’s no secret that the New York Times has taken a no-holds-barred approach with their television adaptation entitled The Weekly. Each week an episode of the FX series digs deep into the serious topics that Americans are dealing with but sometimes willfully ignore—not because we choose to—but because we just don’t know.

To some viewers, The Times’ exposés are controversial but these investigations come at a juncture in history when the free press’ integrity is being questioned. And it’s when we most need real journalism to make a continued impact on our society.

The New York Times is keeping the dream alive with every episode of its series and it feels like something that can live forever, mainly because there’s a whole array of stories worth investigating—ones that haven’t been covered already.

While it’s not feasible for The Times to release 30-plus episodes a year, there’s plenty of material for however many episodes FX Networks wants to greenlight. The question is: Which stories should the New York Times team cover next?

After 13 episodes of groundbreaking investigations, there aren’t a lot of major topics that need to be addressed at this very moment. However, if we’re looking at human interest stories which deserve just as much attention, a handful stands out more than others. Check out our list of noteworthy topics below.

5. Sex-Trafficking “victim” receives clemency after 15 years in prison

Cyntoia Brown was 16-years-old when she was arrested for murdering a man who’d purchased her for sex. Brown was trafficked alongside many other girls in the seedy trade until she fought back against one of the men who picked her up.

According to Brown’s story, she was picked up by 43-year-old Jonny Allen at a fast-food restaurant after being directed by her pimp to go sell her body on the street. Allen and Brown then went back to Allen’s home where he reportedly brandished multiple weapons to her. When she feared he was preparing to use one on her, Brown shot him.

Following the incident, Brown was given a 51-year sentence which is the minimum term for a “life sentence” in Tennessee where the crime was committed. She was only recently released after serving 15 of those 51 years in prison. Her freedom comes after Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam commuted her sentence.

Regardless of being freed from prison, the problem with Cyntoia Brown being incarcerated is still ongoing. The criminal justice system glossed over the fact that Brown had been forced into a prostitute’s life. They didn’t bother to take that factor into consideration when the ruling came down for a life sentence—the state simply ruled against her.

It’s disheartening because Brown didn’t deserve the sentence handed down to her. The young girl was coerced into a life of prostitution at a very early age, and that wasn’t her choice. Cyntoia Brown didn’t grow up with dreams of becoming a prostitute or selling her body, Brown’s pimp made that decision for her. Yet Brown ultimately paid for the rough life thrust upon her.

The New York Times has already done a cover on Brown’s story but they need a television episode of The Weekly so the American people can see that victims of sex-trafficking are being treated like criminals. Cyntoia Brown is just one example but she’s clearly not the first victim to be blamed for the reckless actions of another.