5 Dark Horse Comics that’d make great Netflix shows like Umbrella Academy

David Harbour as ‘Hellboy’ in HELLBOY. Photo Credit: Mark Rogers Summit Entertainment and Millennium Films present, a Lawrence Gordon/Lloyd Levin production, in association with Dark Horse Entertainment, a Nu Boyana production, in association with Campbell Grobman Films.
David Harbour as ‘Hellboy’ in HELLBOY. Photo Credit: Mark Rogers Summit Entertainment and Millennium Films present, a Lawrence Gordon/Lloyd Levin production, in association with Dark Horse Entertainment, a Nu Boyana production, in association with Campbell Grobman Films. /
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2. Nexus

Another entry into the science-fiction and superhero universe, Nexus is a comic that ran in the early ’80s into the late ’90s. It was created by Mike Baron and is set 500 years in the future. Its original runs were on other publishers but Dark Horse picked it up in 2012 in a special set of runs.

The main character, Horatio Valdemar Hellpop, receives powers from an alien, Merk, who then requires Hellpop to kill a mass-murderer every so often. When these assignments were made, Hellpop would experience agonizing headaches and mental states until he completed the task. He continues murdering these targets in order for his power to stay and so he can defend his home planet.

Science fiction had its glory days in the ’70s and 80′ when novels and films were being made or written for fans of the genre. That hasn’t stopped, but it’s certainly less predominant now. One of the most popular, and well-liked, series of late is The Expanse. A Sy-Fy original show that was later picked up by Amazon. That show navigates the operatic elements of space stories and also individual character studies, which is what leads to great science fiction stories.

Unlike the other comics listed here, this series would be more character driven with just one or two main arcs being shown. This would be a great opportunity for Netflix to lock down a major star for three or four seasons in an effort to drive viewership.