5 Dark Horse Comics that’d make great Netflix shows like Umbrella Academy

David Harbour as ‘Hellboy’ in HELLBOY. Photo Credit: Mark Rogers Summit Entertainment and Millennium Films present, a Lawrence Gordon/Lloyd Levin production, in association with Dark Horse Entertainment, a Nu Boyana production, in association with Campbell Grobman Films.
David Harbour as ‘Hellboy’ in HELLBOY. Photo Credit: Mark Rogers Summit Entertainment and Millennium Films present, a Lawrence Gordon/Lloyd Levin production, in association with Dark Horse Entertainment, a Nu Boyana production, in association with Campbell Grobman Films. /
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SAN DIEGO, CA – JULY 27: Matt Wagner attends Dynamite 10th Anniversary Panel – Comic Con International 2014 at San Diego Convention Center on July 27, 2014 in San Diego, California. (Photo by Jerod Harris/Getty Images)
SAN DIEGO, CA – JULY 27: Matt Wagner attends Dynamite 10th Anniversary Panel – Comic Con International 2014 at San Diego Convention Center on July 27, 2014 in San Diego, California. (Photo by Jerod Harris/Getty Images) /

3. Grendel

Everyone loves a villain. Grendel is a comic that started in the early ’80s and told a story of an assassin by night, author by day. His real identity is Hunter Rose who after a while being a nighttime assassin, ends up controlling the organized crime in New York City. Matt Wagner brought the character to life and the series ran for 40 issues into the early ’00s where Dark Horse picked up the rights and published a run. After that last run, the character would crossover into various comics like Batman.

Netflix seems to cling to the idea of an anti-hero that faces moral dilemmas. With their recent purchase of Lucifer and the wildly popular Daredevil and other Marvel properties, it’s obvious that the gray character is needed on-screen. Grendel can be brought into the current time and maybe bring some realism to the story with a few mixings of supernatural elements.

Netflix lost those favorite Marvel shows and will look to fill the void left by five distinct characters and 10+ seasons of their stories. Comic book characters are almost always faced with a deep-rooted moral question and getting a viewpoint from multiple people is a great way to connect fans to the program.