20 best Netflix romantic comedy movies: To All The Boys and more

To All The Boys I've Loved Before | Photo courtesy of Netflix
To All The Boys I've Loved Before | Photo courtesy of Netflix /
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ALPE D’HUEZ, FRANCE – JANUARY 13: (L-R) Pierre Lottin, Sarah Stern and Theo Fernandez arrive at the opening ceremony of the 18th L’Alpe D’Huez International Comedy Film Festival on January 13, 2016 in Alpe d’Huez, France. (Photo by Francois Durand/Getty Images)
ALPE D’HUEZ, FRANCE – JANUARY 13: (L-R) Pierre Lottin, Sarah Stern and Theo Fernandez arrive at the opening ceremony of the 18th L’Alpe D’Huez International Comedy Film Festival on January 13, 2016 in Alpe d’Huez, France. (Photo by Francois Durand/Getty Images) /

13. To Each, Her Own

To Each, Her Own follows Simone as she tries to figure out her sexuality while dealing with the pressures from her conservative Jewish family. At the beginning of the film, she is about to come out to them as a lesbian, but decides against it when her sister begins talking about her wedding.

Simone has a girlfriend, Claire, she’s been telling her family is her roommate and with the wedding coming up, she wants to be able to bring her as what she really is. The problem starts when she meets a man she begins to have feelings for.

To Each, Her Own stars Sarah Stern, Jean-Christophe Folly, Catherine Jacob, Richard Barry, Arie Elmaleh, Clementine Poidatz, and Stephane Debac.

The film goes on to show how Simone deals with her newfound attraction to men (Wali in particular). She doesn’t immediately tell her girlfriend about him which causes a huge conflict once Claire find out she slept with him.

To Each, Her Own is a comedy of errors with Simone at the center. She lies her way into so many problems and doesn’t reveal her secrets until they are staring her right in the face which creates quite a few hilarious confrontations.

But the romance is definitely there as well. You really don’t know until the end whether she’ll stay with Claire or end up with Wali. It takes a difficult subject of figuring out your sexuality (especially as an adult) and gives it a lighthearted spin.